Free Remicade coupon saves with prescription to treat arthritis, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis and colitis.

When your doctor prescribes Remicade, the medication from Janssen Biotech to treat various symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, Ankylosing Spondylitis, ulcerative colitis or plaque psoriasis, you can save on the cost of your prescriptions with the help of the website MyRxCoupons.com

To take advantage of this offer, click here: Remicade coupon.

About Remicade and arthritis, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, ulcerative olitis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

(from the official Remicade website)

How REMICADE® Works: Your immune system works around the clock to protect your body from bacteria, viruses, and other foreign agents. When you have any of these health problems, your immune system becomes overactive and produces excess amounts of a protein called tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-alpha. REMICADE® has been shown to block the action of TNF-alpha, which inhibits the underlying cause of inflammation.

Rheumatoid Arthritis. While the direct cause of RA is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, you may be more likely to experience RA if it’s part of your family’s medical history. Second, RA symptoms begin when your immune system (the body’s natural defense system) attacks healthy cells in your body, for reasons we do not yet understand.

Normally, the immune system protects your body from bacteria, viruses, or other foreign agents. When you have RA, your immune system incorrectly targets the linings of your joints. This causes uncontrolled inflammation—leading to the symptoms and potential joint damage usually experienced with RA.

RA can affect men and women but it affects more women than men. RA also: Affects more than 1.3 million Americans; Is one of the most common forms of arthritis; Can develop at any age, though it commonly begins between the ages of 30 and 50.

If you think you may be experiencing symptoms of RA, talk to a rheumatologist as soon as possible. Common symptoms of RA include: Joint stiffness; Joint pain; Swelling; Morning stiffness that lasts longer than 30 minutes. Other potential symptoms of RA include: Loss of energy (fatigue); Loss of appetite; Fever. Only a rheumatologist can determine if your symptoms are being caused by RA. Rheumatologists are specialist doctors who treat arthritis conditions and other joint diseases.

Psoriatic Arthritis. While the direct cause of PsA is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, you may be more likely to experience PsA if it’s part of your family’s medical history. Second, PsA symptoms begin when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body, for reasons we do not yet understand.

Normally, the immune system (the body’s natural defense system) protects your body from bacteria, viruses, or other foreign agents. When you have PsA, your immune system incorrectly attacks the linings of the joints and skin. This causes uncontrolled inflammation—leading to the joint and skin symptoms usually experienced with PsA.

Approximately 15% of people with psoriasis can develop PsA, which affects men and women equally. The disease can appear at any age, but usually occurs in people between the ages of 30 and 50. In many patients, joint symptoms can develop before skin symptoms appear. A rheumatologist or a dermatologist can determine if your symptoms are due to PsA. Rheumatologists are physicians who focus on treating arthritis and other joint diseases, while dermatologists are physicians who specialize in treating skin conditions. If you receive a diagnosis of active PsA, your rheumatologist may prescribe REMICADE® as part of your treatment plan.

If you experience any of the following symptoms of PsA, talk to a rheumatologist (arthritis specialist) as soon as possible.

 Joint Symptoms: PsA usually affects the finger and toe joints, but you may also experience symptoms in the lower back and heels. Some other characteristics of PsA include: Dactylitis (dak’-ti-li’tis), or inflammation and swelling in the joints at the ends of fingers or toes; Enthesitis (en’-the-si’-tis),or inflammation in the tendons or ligaments and can occur at the heel.

Skin symptoms: In PsA, uncontrolled inflammation can lead to the body producing too many skin cells. When the body produces too many of these cells, you can also get skin lesions. These lesions are areas of red patches covered by red and white scaly skin. They can occur anywhere on the body. Because the symptoms of PsA may resemble those of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), doctors may first look for scaly skin lesions. Since there is no simple test for determining whether you may have RA versus PsA, your doctor may look for cell abnormalities by examining a skin sample under a microscope. Typically, skin symptoms of PsA will appear before the arthritis associated with PsA. Blood tests and x-ray or MRI studies may also help confirm a diagnosis. When you have psoriasis and PsA, you have a skin condition that is marked by a rapid buildup of dry, dead skin cells that form thick scales.

Ankylosing Spondylitis is more common in men than in women. Unlike other rheumatoid diseases, symptoms of AS can appear as early as childhood, although onset usually occurs between the ages of 17 and 35. It’s important to note that the course of AS varies from person to person. There are risk factors for AS, such as having a family member with AS. It can be difficult to diagnose because symptoms are similar to other diseases. Only a rheumatologist can decide if your symptoms are caused by AS. Rheumatologists are specialists who treat arthritic conditions and other joint diseases. If you’re diagnosed with AS, your rheumatologist may prescribe REMICADE® as part of your treatment plan.

The symptoms of AS vary from person to person. During your examination, your doctor will look for spinal symptoms and additional symptoms (sometimes called peripheral symptoms). Spinal symptoms affect your spine, while the additional symptoms of AS may occur in your joints or internal organs. Talk to your doctor if you experience any of the following spinal symptoms. When AS affects the spine, it may lead to: Pain at the sacroiliac joints, the places where the spine joins your pelvis; Forward-stooped shoulders; Pain or stiffness of the lower back and buttocks; Pain or restrictive stiffness in the neck, hips, thighs, shoulder blades, and heels. People with AS may also experience the following symptoms: Spinal pain; Joint pain; Heel pain; Morning stiffness; Range of motion decreased; Difficulty performing daily activities.

Crohn’s Disease is one of a group of disorders collectively referred to as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CD causes painful inflammation in your digestive tract and usually occurs in the lower part of the small intestine or colon.

While the direct cause of CD is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, you may be more likely to experience CD if it’s part of your family’s medical history. Second, CD symptoms begin when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body, for reasons we do not yet understand. Normally, the immune system (the body’s natural defense system), protects your body from bacteria, viruses and other foreign agents. When you have CD, your immune system incorrectly targets your gastrointestinal tract. This causes inflammation—leading to the symptoms and flares usually experienced with CD.

Approximately 500,000 Americans have CD, which affects men and women equally.

What’s more, CD seems to run in families—20-25% of people with CD have a close relative with some form of IBD. CD most often appears in people between the ages of 15 and 30, although it may occur at any age. People of Caucasian and Jewish origins have a higher risk of developing IBD compared with other racial and ethnic subgroups.

Symptoms may range from mild to severe. They tend to show up after meals, with pain usually centered at or below the navel, often in the lower right section of the abdomen. People with CD have periodic disease flares (when the disease is active), followed by periods of remission (times when there are few or no symptoms). The most common symptoms of CD include: Abdominal pain; Cramping; Frequent diarrhea; Fever; Rectal bleeding. Others symptoms may include: Loss of appetite; Weight loss; Fatigue. Fistulas are another common symptom. Fistulas occur when the inflammation and ulcers caused by CD break through the intestinal wall and form an abscess (or a tunnel) outside of it.

Pediatric Crohn’s Disease is an inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract that occurs in children younger than 17 years of age. While the exact incidence of PCD is unknown, it is estimated that 10% of new cases of Crohn’s disease occur in patients younger than 18 years of age, or an estimated 140,000 children. PCD usually presents during the mid to late teens, but it has been detected in even younger children.

Crohn’s disease causes painful inflammation in the digestive tract. This usually occurs in the lower part of the small intestine or colon. Both adult and pediatric Crohn’s patients may experience a number of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal cramps and pain, fever, rectal bleeding, loss of appetite, and weight loss. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently.

While the direct cause of PCD is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, children may be more likely to experience PCD if it’s part of their family’s medical history. Second, PCD symptoms begin when the immune system attacks healthy cells in a child’s body, for reasons we do not yet understand. Normally, the immune system (the body’s natural defense system), protects the body from bacteria, viruses and other foreign agents. When children have PCD, their immune system incorrectly targets their gastrointestinal tract. This causes inflammation—leading to the symptoms and flares usually experienced with PCD.

PCD usually presents in children during the mid to late teens; however, it has been detected in even younger children. Symptoms of PCD can range in severity and may develop over time or very suddenly. Symptoms typically include: Stomach pain; Cramping; Diarrhea; Weight loss; Fever.These symptoms can have a serious impact on a child’s quality of life. If your child is still experiencing the cycle of good days and bad days, the symptoms aren’t really under control. The good news is, treatments are available to control symptoms.

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic (or ongoing) disease of the colon or large intestine. UC is known as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)—a term used to describe a number of inflammatory diseases which affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. If you have an inflammatory disorder such as UC, your immune system attacks your own GI tissues.

People with UC can experience a number of signs and symptoms, including severe abdominal cramping and pain, fatigue, and the sudden, uncontrollable urge for bowel movements. But with appropriate medical treatment, many people with UC are able to achieve real symptom control. While the direct cause of UC is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, you may be more likely to experience UC if it’s part of your family’s medical history. Second, UC symptoms begin when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body, for reasons we do not yet understand.

Normally, the immune system (the body’s natural defense system), protects your body from bacteria, viruses and other foreign agents. When you have UC, your immune system incorrectly targets your GI tract. This causes inflammation—leading to the symptoms and flares usually experienced with UC, which affects approximately 500,000 Americans. Your risk is higher if you have a close relative, such as a parent, sibling, or child, who has UC

UC typically develops in people between the ages of 15 and 30 or 50 and 70. However, it is possible for anyone at any age to develop UC. People of Caucasian and Jewish origins have a higher risk of developing IBD compared with other racial and ethnic subgroups. The most common symptoms of UC include blood in the stool or bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, cramping, and the sudden urge for bowel movements. Other symptoms of UC include: Severe diarrhea; Frequent bowel movements; Rectal bleeding; Loss of appetite; Weight loss; Fatigue. Some people with UC may also have tiny open sores (or ulcers) that form on the surface of the lining of the colon. These sores can bleed and produce pus and mucus. Because inflammation makes the colon empty frequently, other complications can arise, such as unwanted weight loss and blood loss.

Plaque Psoriasis. Because the symptoms of plaque psoriasis appear on the surface of your skin, you might think the problem starts there. In fact, plaque psoriasis begins beneath the surface, by shortening the normal life cycle of your skin cells. In healthy skin, cells mature, rise to the surface, and are shed every 28 to 30 days. Skin cells affected by plaque psoriasis, however, mature in only 3 to 5 days–much faster than your body can shed them.

While the direct cause of plaque psoriasis is unknown, here’s what we do know: First, you may be more likely to experience plaque psoriasis if it’s part of your family’s medical history. Second, plaque psoriasis symptoms begin when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body, for reasons we do not yet understand. Normally, your immune system (the body’s natural defense system), protects your body from bacteria, viruses, and other foreign agents. Research has suggested that plaque psoriasis may be linked to an overactive immune system, which causes the body to accelerate the growth of skin cells at a faster pace than usual. As a result, thickened, red patches, covered by silvery scales appear on the surface of your skin. Doctors refer to these as psoriatic plaques.

In the United States, as many as 7.5 million people have been diagnosed with plaque psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis affects men and women equally, but research has suggested that ethnicity may be a factor. Psoriasis is more common among Caucasians of European descent than among African Americans or Asians. Symptoms of plaque psoriasis usually appear between the ages of 15 and 25. About a third of people who have plaque psoriasis have a family history of the disease. Only a dermatologist can determine if you have plaque psoriasis.

Plaque psoriasis is characterized by thickened, red patches covered by silvery scales, which appear on the surface of your skin, and may itch or feel sore. They can occur anywhere on your body in just a few places, or over large areas of your body.

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